DIFFERENT TYPES OF UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS AND NOT LESS THAN FIVE WAYS EACH CAN BE USED


DIFFERENT TYPES OF UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS AND NOT LESS THAN FIVE WAYS EACH CAN BE USED

INTRODUCTION
“Publication” is a technical term in legal contexts and especially important in copyright legislation. An author of a work generally is the initial owner of the copyright on the work. One of the copyrights granted to the author of a work is the exclusive right to publish the work. Thus, an unpublished materials refers to any information source that is not officially released by an individual, publishing house, or other company, and can include both paper and electronic sources. Some examples of unpublished sources may include manuscripts accepted for publication but still “in-press,” data from an unpublished study, letters, manuscripts in preparation, memos, personal communications (including e-mails), and raw data. Titles of unpublished works should be capitalized and enclosed in quotation marks. In a note, the identification of a thesis or dissertation, the academic institution, and the date are enclosed in parentheses.
A material that has not undergone publication, and thus is not generally available to the public, or for citation in scholarly or legal contexts, is called an unpublished material. In some cases unpublished materials are widely cited, or circulated via informal means
FIVE WAYS UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS CAN BE USED
A work that has not undergone publication, and thus is not generally available to the public, or for citation in scholarly or legal contexts, is called an unpublished work or material. In some cases unpublished works are widely cited, or circulated via informal means. An author who has not yet published a work may also be referred to as being unpublished.
The status of being unpublished has specific significance in the legal context, where it may refer to the non-publication of legal opinions in the United States. Some of the five ways this unpublished materials can be used can be outline below;
i. Try and seek the permission of the copyright owners, be they the authors themselves, their heirs, or a third party in referencing or quoting their book.
ii. a licencing fee should be paid to the copyright owners to used their unpublished materials
iii. Reach out to the author and agree terms with him.
iv. Only relevant materials should be sited and the authors name must be quoted clearly
iv. Persons using or quoting from these sources should endeavour to make it so known to the readers that materials are being sourced from.

CONCLUSION
References to unpublished material may include articles or abstracts that have been presented at a society meeting but not published and material accepted for publication but not published. If, during the course of the publication process, these materials are published or accepted for publication, and if the author is familiar with the later version, the most up-to-date bibliographic information should be included.

REFERENCES
Berne Convention, article 3(3). URL last accessed 2010-05-10.
Universal Copyright Convention, Gevena text (1952), article VI. URL last accessed 2010-05-10.

German UrhG, §6, in German. URL last accessed 2007-05-29.

Australian Copyright Act, section 29: Publication. URL last accessed 2007-05-29.

Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (c. 48), section 175, Copyright law of the United Kingdom. URL last accessed 2007-05-29.

Hawksworth, D. L. (2011). “A new dawn for the naming of fungi: impacts of decisions made in Melbourne in July 2011 on the future publication and regulation of fungal names”. MycoKeys 1: 7–20. doi:10.3897/mycokeys.1.2062.

“APA REFERENCE STYLE: Unpublished Sources”. linguistics.byu.edu. 2002. Retrieved 7 March 2012.

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