SUPPORT FOR THE TEACHING AND INTRODUCTION OF SEX EDUCATION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL


SUPPORT FOR THE TEACHING AND INTRODUCTION OF SEX EDUCATION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

INTRODUCTION
Sex education is the act of informing younger and adult generations about everything they need to know about sex. Sex education is one of the most controversial issues in education, which has been floating on educational institutions since ages.
Sex education is not just about sex. It includes other sensitive issues like sexual health, sexual reproduction, sexuality and others that parents often feel uncomfortable talking with their children. Therefore, it becomes the responsibility of schools to address this issue, and inform and educate students about it as much as possible. Often, sexual education in schools is considered as a recreational course rather than a serious issue. There are many pros and cons of sexual education being taught in the public schools.

SUPPORT FOR INTRODUCING SEX EDUCATION
Sexuality Education teaches students facts about contraception, repercussions of casual sex, and the prevention of diseases from a health perspective. This is in addition to teaching teenagers about building healthy relationships and how to say “no” to sexual advances.
Sexuality Education teaches students what homosexuality is, and the current legal provisions concerning homosexual acts in the world.
Evidence shows that a combination of comprehensive sex education and access to birth control appears to decrease the rates of unintended pregnancies among teenagers.[10] A meta-analysis compared comprehensive sex education programs with abstinence-only programs found that abstinence-only programs did not reduce the likelihood of pregnancy, but rather may have increased it.[11] Numerous studies show that curricula providing accurate information about condoms and contraception can lead to reductions in the risky behaviors reported by young people as well as reductions in unintended pregnancies and STIs.[12] Programs that teach only abstinence have not been shown to be effective
Supporters claim that exposure to such information, including STDs and the proper use of contraceptives, lowers teen pregnancy and STD infection rates. In addition, they argue that most teenagers are either already sexually active or are curious and that many of them are not receiving such information from their parents, claiming public schools are a proper venue for sex education. As such, these supporters typically favor a more comprehensive approach that includes detailed description of a female and mail genitals, for example.
Much of the debate today is centered on whether schools should teach abstinence-only or comprehensive sex education. Those favoring an abstinence-only approach correctly point out that abstinence is the only way to prevent pregnancy and STDs with 100 percent certainty. They also point out the emotional complexities that often accompany an active sex life. Properly taught, sexual education could become a regular and ongoing Human Anatomy and Biology complete with tests and grading that goes toward graduation credits where students learn a lot about their body systems. Also Students can be taught the correct terms of the reproductive system of sexually transmitted diseases and contraception birth instead of “street slang.”

CONCLUSION
Allowing sex education to be taught in school could help displace Myths surrounding sex, which can be dispelled (for example, can not get pregnant the first time).Studies also show that many teenagers become sexually active before the inclusion of educational classes. Principles of inclusion of classes has been shown to help students stay or to abstain or at least be responsible if they are active. Proper education can have an impact on the prevention of sexual problems in adulthood.
Recent polls by various media, health, and social organizations have concluded that most families support the idea of teaching sex education in schools to some extent. Although there are still pockets of parents who adamantly reject the idea that schools teach their children anything about sex, there is generally little debate that some form of sex education should be taught — even if abstinence-only.

REFERENCES
• Tupper, Kenneth (2013). “Sex, Drugs and the Honour Roll: The Perennial Challenges of Addressing Moral Purity Issues in Schools”. Critical Public Health 24 (2): 115–131. doi:10.1080/09581596.2013.862517.
• • “Namibia National Policy on HIV/AIDS for the Education Sector” (PDF). USAID Health Policy Initiative. 2003. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
• • Piya Sorcar (December 1, 2010). “A New Approach to Global HIV/AIDS Education”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved December 16, 2010.
• SIECUS Report of Public Support of Sexuality Education (2009)SIECUS Report Online at the Wayback Machine

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