FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF ANY COMPANY OF YOUR CHOICE, ANALYSE THE STATEMENT USING THE 6 MAJOR FINANCIAL RATIOS. EXPLAIN THE PURPOSE OF EACH OF THE FINANCIAL RATIOS. THEN ATTACH THE COMPANY WITH IT.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF ANY COMPANY OF YOUR CHOICE, ANALYSE THE STATEMENT USING THE 6 MAJOR FINANCIAL RATIOS. EXPLAIN THE PURPOSE OF EACH OF THE FINANCIAL RATIOS. THEN ATTACH THE COMPANY WITH IT.
INTRODUCTION
A financial statement (or financial report) is a formal record of the financial activities of a business, person, or other entity.
Relevant financial information is presented in a structured manner and in a form easy to understand. They typically include basic financial statements, accompanied by a management discussion and analysis:
SIX MAJOR FINANCIAL RATIOS
Financial ratios are relationships determined from a company’s financial information and used for comparison purposes. Examples include such often referred to measures as return on investment (ROI), return on assets (ROA), and debt-to-equity, to name just three. These ratios are the result of dividing one account balance or financial measurement with another. Usually these measurements or account balances are found on one of the company’s financial statements—balance sheet, income statement, cashflow statement, and/or statement of changes in owner’s equity. Financial ratios can provide small business owners and managers with a valuable tool with which to measure their progress against predetermined internal goals, a certain competitor, or the overall industry. In addition, tracking various ratios over time is a powerful means of identifying trends in their early stages. Ratios are also used by bankers, investors, and business analysts to assess a company’s financial status.
1.PROFITABILITY OR RETURN ON INVESTMENT RATIOS
Profitability ratios provide information about management’s performance in using the resources of the small business. Many entrepreneurs decide to start their own businesses in order to earn a better return on their money than would be available through a bank or other low-risk investments. If profitability ratios demonstrate that this is not occurring—particularly once a small business has moved beyond the start-up phase—then entrepreneurs for whom a return on their money is the foremost concern may wish to sell the business and reinvest their money elsewhere.
2.LIQUIDITY RATIOS
Liquidity ratios demonstrate a company’s ability to pay its current obligations. In other words, they relate to the availability of cash and other assets to cover accounts payable, short-term debt, and other liabilities. All small businesses require a certain degree of liquidity in order to pay their bills on time, though start-up and very young companies are often not very liquid. In mature companies, low levels of liquidity can indicate poor management or a need for additional capital. Any company’s liquidity may vary due to seasonality, the timing of sales, and the state of the economy.
3.LEVERAGE RATIOS
Leverage ratios look at the extent to which a company has depended upon borrowing to finance its operations. As a result, these ratios are reviewed closely by bankers and investors. Most leverage ratios compare assets or net worth with liabilities. A high leverage ratio may increase a company’s exposure to risk and business downturns, but along with this higher risk also comes the potential for higher returns. Some of the major measurements of leverage include:
Debt to equity ratio: Debt ratio: Fixed to worth ratio: Interest coverage:
4.EFFICIENCY RATIOS
By assessing a company’s use of credit, inventory, and assets, efficiency ratios can help small business owners and managers conduct business better. These ratios can show how quickly the company is collecting money for its credit sales or how many times inventory turns over in a given time period. This information can help management decide whether the company’s credit terms are appropriate and whether its purchasing efforts are handled in an efficient manner. The following are some of the main indicators of efficiency:
Annual inventory turnover: Cost of Goods Sold for the Year/Average Inventory—shows how efficiently the company is managing its production, warehousing, and distribution of product, considering its volume of sales. Higher ratios—over six or seven times per year—are generally thought to be better, although extremely high inventory turnover may indicate a narrow selection and possibly lost sales. A low inventory turnover rate, on the other hand, means that the company is paying to keep a large inventory, and may be overstocking or carrying obsolete items.
Inventory holding period: Inventory to assets ratio Accounts receivable turnover Net (credit) Collection period 365/Accounts Receivable Turnover
5.RETURN ON ASSETS
The return on assets (ROA) shows the percentage of how profitable a company’s assets are in generating revenue.
ROA can be computed as:
[1]
This number tells you what the company can do with what it has, i.e. how many dollars of earnings they derive from each dollar of assets they control. It’s a useful number for comparing competing companies in the same industry. The number will vary widely across different industries. Return on assets gives an indication of the capital intensity of the company, which will depend on the industry; companies that require large initial investments will generally have lower return on assets. ROAs over 5% are generally considered good.
ROA tells you what earnings were generated from invested capital (assets). ROA for public companies can vary substantially and will be highly dependent on the industry. This is why when using ROA as a comparative measure, it is best to compare it against a company’s previous ROA numbers or the ROA of a similar company.

6. DEBT-EQUITY RATIO
The debt-equity ratio is another leverage ratio that compares a company’s total liabilities to its total shareholders’ equity. This is a measurement of how much suppliers, lenders, creditors and obligors have committed to the company versus what the shareholders have committed.
To a large degree, the debt-equity ratio provides another vantage point on a company’s leverage position, in this case, comparing total liabilities to shareholders’ equity, as opposed to total assets in the debt ratio.
Thus, The debt-to-equity ratio (D/E) is a financial ratio indicating the relative proportion of shareholders’ equity and debt used to finance a company’s assets.[1] Closely related to leveraging, the ratio is also known as Risk, Gearing or Leverage. The two components are often taken from the firm’s balance sheet or statement of financial position (so-called book value), but the ratio may also be calculated using market values for both, if the company’s debt and equity are publicly traded, or using a combination of book value for debt and market value for equity financially.

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