TWITTER AND YOU TUBE


Twitter is an online social networking service and microblogging service that enables its users to send and read text-based messages of up to 140 characters, known as “tweets”.
It was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey and launched that July. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity, with over 500 million active users as of 2012, generating over 340 million tweets daily and handling over 1.6 billion search queries per day. Since its launch, Twitter has become one of the top 10 most visited websites on the Internet, and has been described as “the SMS of the Internet.” Unregistered users can read tweets, while registered users can post tweets through the website interface, SMS, or a range of apps for mobile devices.
WHEREAS, YouTube is a video-sharing website, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005, on which users can upload, view and share videos. The company is based in San Bruno, California, and uses Adobe Flash Video and HTML5 technology to display a wide variety of user-generated video content, including movie clips, TV clips, and music videos, as well as amateur content such as video blogging and short original videos.
WHAT IS TWITTES?
Simply put, a Tweet is a message sent on Twitter. To send or receive a Tweet, you have to create a free account with Twitter. You also need to have friends and contacts with Twitter accounts — otherwise you’re typing to the void. Of course, you could use Twitter as a blog and keep all of your Tweets public, meaning anyone could read them on your personal Twitter profile page. But if you want to use Twitter as a way to keep in touch with friends, you’ll need to convince them to sign up, too.
Once you have an account, you can begin building your network of contacts. You can invite other users to receive your Tweets, and you can follow other members’ posts. As you receive Tweets, you may discover you’re looking into only part of a conversation. You’ll see your contact’s posts, but if he or she is sending messages in response to someone who isn’t in your network, you won’t see the other person’s messages.
Tweets have a few limitations, mostly due to the fact that Twitter’s design relies heavily on cell phone text messages. Tweets can only have up to 140 characters before the system cuts off the rest of the message for cell phone users. Members can read full Tweets on their Twitter Web pages or by using a third-party developer’s desktop or Web-based application.
How Twitter Works
Many social networking Web sites have lots of bells and whistles. Sites like MySpace and Facebook let users build profiles, upload pictures, incorporate multimedia, keep a blog and integrate useful or bizarre programs into homepages. But one Web company with a very simple service is rapidly becoming one of the most talked-about social networking service providers: Twitter.
So what does Twitter do? When you sign up with Twitter, you can use the service to post and receive messages to a network of contacts. Instead of sending a dozen e-mails or text messages, you send one message to your Twitter account, and the service distributes it to all your friends. Members use Twitter to organize impromptu gatherings, carry on a group conversation or just send a quick update to let people know what’s going on.
Twitter’s history is entwined with a few other Internet companies. Twitter’s founders are Evan Williams, Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey. A few years before Twitter was born, Williams created Blogger, a popular Web journal service. Internet giant Google purchased Blogger, and Williams began to work directly for Google. Before long, he and Google employee Stone left the Internet giant to form a new company called Odeo.
Odeo is a podcasting service company. According to Williams, he didn’t have a personal interest in podcasting, and under his guidance, the company temporarily lost focus. However, one of Odeo’s products was just beginning to gather steam: Twitter, a new messaging service. Stone gave Twitter its name, comparing the short spurts of information exchange to the chirping of birds and pointing out that many ring tones sound like bird calls .
As the service became a more important part of Odeo, Stone and Williams decided to form a new company with Twitter as the flagship product. Williams bought out Odeo and Twitter from investors, then combined the existing company and service into a new venture called Obvious Corporation. Jack Dorsey joined the team and began to develop new ways for users to interface with Twitter, including through computer applications like instant messaging and e-mail. In March 2006, Twitter split off from Obvious to become its own company, Twitter Incorporated.
WHAT IS YOU-TUBE
You tube is a popular free video-sharing Web site that lets registered users upload and share video clips online at the YouTube.com Web site. To view the videos you are not required to register. Launched in 2005 by former PayPal employees, the video-sharing site was acquired by Google Inc. in October 2006 for US $1.65 billion in Google stock. YouTube is currently based in San Bruno, CA and is a subsidiary of Google, Inc.
HOW YOU-TUBE WORKS
Basically, YouTube is a video-hosting website that allows users to upload videos to the site and allowing visitors to search and watch videos anytime they want, conveniently, quickly, and at no cost. With an easy-to-navigate website layout and user-friendly features, YouTube makes it a cinch for people to upload videos, and even easier for people to view videos. A search function allows visitors to search videos by keywords or topics ranging from the David Letterman Show to hilarious home video clips.
CONCLUSION
From the foregoing it can be seen that the concept of both social networking sites in the Nigerian society has grown considerably with it usage more common among the youths in Nigeria. Moreover the use of application software’s like smart phones and blackberry phones have revolutionized the way this socio networks are being use in the country.

REFERENCES
• ^ a b Dorsey, Jack (March 21, 2006). “just setting up my twttr”. Twitter. http://twitter.com/jack/status/20. Retrieved February 4, 2011.
• ^ “Contact Us”. http://twitter.com/about/contact.
• ^ a b Staff writer (July 15, 2009). “Hacker Exposes Private Twitter Documents”. Bits (blog of The New York Times). http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/15/hacker-exposes-private-twitter-documents/?hpw.. Retrieved February 23, 2011.
• ^ Kafka, Peter (April 3, 2012). “Twitter Expands European Business”. All Things Digital. Dow Jones & Company. http://allthingsd.com/20120403/twitter-expands-european-business/. Retrieved April 3, 2012.
• ^ a b “Twitter.com Site Info”. Alexa Internet. http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/twitter.com. Retrieved August 2, 2012.
• ^ a b “Twitter has 500 million registered users”. http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/500-million-registered-users_b18842.
• ^ a b c Arrington, Michael (July 15, 2006). “Odeo Releases Twttr”. TechCrunch. AOL. http://techcrunch.com/2006/07/15/is-twttr-interesting/. Retrieved September 18, 2010.
• ^ Twitter Search Team (May 31, 2011). “The Engineering Behind Twitter’s New Search Experience”. Twitter Engineering Blog. Twitter. http://engineering.twitter.com/2011/05/engineering-behind-twitters-new-search.html. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
• ^ “Youtube.com Site Info”. Alexa Internet. http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/youtube.com. Retrieved 2012-08-02.
• ^ a b “YouTube language versions”. http://i.imgur.com/C2mND.png. Retrieved January 15, 2012.

13 responses

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  3. Wow that was odd. I just wrote an incredibly long comment but after I
    clicked submit my comment didn’t appear. Grrrr… well I’m not writing
    all that over again. Anyhow, just wanted to say fantastic blog!

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