THE SOURCES OF CUSTOMERS COMPLAINS IN BANKS AND HOW IT CAN BE NIPPED IN THE BUD?


INTRODUCTION
A bank is a financial institution and a financial intermediary that accepts deposits and channels those deposits into lending activities, either directly or through capital markets. A bank connects customers that have capital deficits to customers with capital surpluses.
Due to their critical status within the financial system and the economy generally, banks are highly regulated in most countries. Most banks operate under a system known as fractional reserve banking where they hold only a small reserve of the funds deposited and lend out the rest for profit. They are generally subject to minimum capital requirements which are based on an international set of capital standards, known as the Basel Accords.
The definition of a bank varies from country to country. In most common law jurisdictions there is a Bills of Exchange Act that codifies the law in relation to negotiable instruments, including cheques, and this Act contains a statutory definition of the term banker: banker includes a body of persons, whether incorporated or not, who carry on the business of banking’ (Section 2, Interpretation). Although this definition seems circular, it is actually functional, because it ensures that the legal basis for bank transactions such as cheques does not depend on how the bank is organized or regulated.
The business of banking is in many English common law countries not defined by statute but by common law, the definition above. In other English common law jurisdictions there are statutory definitions of the business of banking or banking business. When looking at these definitions it is important to keep in mind that they are defining the business of banking for the purposes of the legislation, and not necessarily in general. In particular, most of the definitions are from legislation that has the purposes of entry regulating and supervising banks rather than regulating the actual business of banking. However, in many cases the statutory definition closely mirrors the common law one. Examples of statutory definitions:
• “banking business” means the business of receiving money on current or deposit account, paying and collecting cheques drawn by or paid in by customers, the making of advances to customers, and includes such other business as the Authority may prescribe for the purposes of this Act; (Banking Act (Singapore), Section 2, Interpretation).
• “banking business” means the business of either or both of the following:
1. receiving from the general public money on current, deposit, savings or other similar account repayable on demand or within less than [3 months] … or with a period of call or notice of less than that period;
2. paying or collecting checks drawn by or paid in by customers[7]
Since the advent of EFTPOS (Electronic Funds Transfer at Point Of Sale), direct credit, direct debit and internet banking, the cheque has lost its primacy in most banking systems as a payment instrument. This has led legal theorists to suggest that the cheque based definition should be broadened to include financial institutions that conduct current accounts for customers and enable customers to pay and be paid by third parties, even if they do not pay and collect checks.[8]

The oldest bank still in existence is Monte dei Paschi di Siena, headquartered in Siena, Italy, which has been operating continuously since 1472.
Thus a A customer (also known as a client, buyer, or purchaser) is the recipient of a good, service, product, or idea, obtained from a seller, vendor, or supplier for a monetary or other valuable consideration.[1][2] Customers are generally categorized into two types:
• An intermediate customer or trade customer (more informally: “the trade”) who is a dealer that purchases goods for re-sale.
• An ultimate customer who does not in turn re-sell the things bought but either passes them to the consumer or actually is the consumer.
A customer may or may not also be a consumer, but the two notions are distinct, even though the terms are commonly confused.[3][1] A customer purchases goods; a consumer uses them.[4][5] An ultimate customer may be a consumer as well, but just as equally may have purchased items for someone else to consume. An intermediate customer is not a consumer at all.[3][1] The situation is somewhat complicated in that ultimate customers of so-called industrial goods and services (who are entities such as government bodies, manufacturers, and educational and medical institutions) either themselves use up the goods and services that they buy, or incorporate them into other finished products, and so are technically consumers, too. However, they are rarely called that, but are rather called industrial customers or business-to-business customers. Similarly, customers who buy services rather than goods are rarely called consumers.
In the present banking system, excellence in customer service is the most important tool for sustained business growth. Customer complaints are part of the business life of any corporate entity. This is more so for banks because they are service organizations. As a service organiza-tion, customer service and satisfaction should
be the prime concern of any bank. The bank believes that providing prompt and efficient service is essential not only to attract new customers, but also to retain existing ones. However, banks minimize instances of customer complaints and grievances through proper service delivery and review mechanism and to ensure prompt
redress of customer complaints and grievances. The review mechanism should help in identifying shortcomings in product features and service delivery. Customer dissatisfaction can ruin the name and image of a bank. As such, bank policy on grievance redress is as follows:
1. Customers are to be treated fairly at all times.
2. Complaints should be raised by customers with
courtesy and on time.
3. Customers should be fully informed of avenues to
escalate their complaints/grievances within the
organization and their rights to alternative remedies, if
they are not fully satisfied with the response of the bank
to their complaints.
4. Bank to treat all complaints efficiently and fairly as they
can damage the bank’s reputation and business if
handled otherwise.
5. The bank employees must work in good faith and
without prejudice to the interests of the customer.

Some of the sources of customers complains in the banking industry includes;

1. sky high ATM charges
2. abitiary charges on sms charges
3. fees on passbook.cheque issuance
4. non response to debit orders
5. daily withdrawal limits
6. high charges on deposites

2 responses

  1. Pingback: LC Discounting Faciltiy | Funds Against LC « INVESTMENT IN INDIA

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